Glaze

Etymologically, this word in its first definition comes from “glass”  and is to cover with a glaze or with glass, specifically

To cover … with a vitreous substance which is fixed by fusion

In the second meaning, “glaze” is to stare, and comes from “glare” which seems to derive from Middle Dutch or Middle Low German phrase for “grey-eyed”.  Note to self – follow up with grey eyed characters.

So – the eyes stare fixedly as the vitreous fluid boils and fixes in death.  Oh, wow.  This image will never be the same for me.  Adding the gem tag!

  • 06.078 till beards blaze, and eyes glaze;

“glare, v.” OED Online. Oxford University Press, June 2015. Web. 26 July 2015.

“glaze, v.1.” OED Online. Oxford University Press, June 2015. Web. 26 July 2015.

“glaze, v.2.” OED Online. Oxford University Press, June 2015. Web. 26 July 2015.

Glade

This word has rather obscure etymology, but may, through its meaning of a sunny place in the woods, be related to “gleam”!

  • 03.012 when they came at length to an open glade
  • 06.052 and they ran to the trees at the edge of the glade,
  • 06.052 a large pine standing at the very edge of the glade.
  • 06.060 This glade in the ring of trees
  • 06.060 in the glade;
  • 06.065 Very soon all about the glade wolves were rolling over
  • 08.099 in the glade where they lived,
  • 19.001 into the lower glades of the wood

“glade, n.2.” OED Online. Oxford University Press, June 2015. Web. 26 July 2015.

Glimpse

The current sense of “glimpse” – a passing view – blends with the archaic meaning of “a flash” as Tolkien uses it in The Hobbit.  Glimpses of treasure – was that the twinkle?  or the dwarves’ view of the twinkle?  I am, as ever, delighted.

  • 03.018 Soon Bilbo caught glimpses of them
  • 05.124 a glimpse of endless unmarked days
  • 05.130 a glimpse of light.
  • 06.001 and plains glimpsed occasionally between the trees.
  • 08.003 he could catch glimpses of them whisking off the path
  • 09.062 Also he had caught a glimpse of a fire through the trees,
  • 11.021 in which he sometimes thought he could catch glimpses
  • 11.029 he could see a glimpse of the distant forest.
  • 12.076 that the hobbit had already caught a glimpse
  • 13.023 and caught a glimpse of great passages
  • 13.032 The mere fleeting glimpses of treasure

“glimpse, n.” OED Online. Oxford University Press, March 2015. Web. 11 May 2015.

Glimmer

Just a little flash of light.  Tolkien does not use the obsolete meaning in The Hobbit, but I’m delighted to note it here: a flash of eyes.

  • 04.018 Now there came a glimmer
  • 05.009 as he knew by the glimmer of his sword,
  • 05.109 as Bilbo could see from the faint glimmer on the walls.
  • 08.002 in a sort of darkened green glimmer.
  • 08.033 They glimmered
  • 13.044 A white glimmer could be seen

“glimmer, v.” OED Online. Oxford University Press, March 2015. Web. 11 May 2015.

Gleam

“Gleam”, distributed fairly evenly throughout the work, is related to “glimmer” and “glimpse”.  The root *glim- can be found in glimmer, glimpse, glim (brightness).  It’s a ray of light or even of radiant beauty.

  • 01.075 There many a gleaming golden hoard
  • 03.001 and behind its shoulders the tips of snow-peaks gleamed.
  • 04.041 It burned with a rage that made it gleam
  • 05.126 and his eyes gleamed cold
  • 05.127 in the gleam of his own eyes,
  • 06.052 but you could see his eyes gleaming
  • 08.005 and when it was Bilbo’s turn he would see gleams
  • 08.005 and sometimes they would gleam down
  • 08.071 Their gleaming hair was twined with flowers;
  • 10.020 The gold gleamed on his neck
  • 11.029 there was a gleam of yellow upon its far roof,
  • 11.032 A gleam of light came straight through the opening
  • 11.037 The gleam went out,
  • 13.009 There was not a gleam of light –
  • 13.017 a twinkling gleam showed them returning,
  • 13.019 the same white gleam had shone before him
  • 17.050 with a gleam of chill flame,
  • 17.055 in the gloom the great dwarf gleamed like gold
  • 17.062 Seeing the sudden gleam
  • 18.032 that it gleamed ever
  • 18.053 snow yet unmelted was gleaming pale.

“gleam, n.” OED Online. Oxford University Press, March 2015. Web. 11 May 2015.