Accursed

I’ve been looking forward to this one ever since I saw “accursed” used as an example a few words ago.  It could be “a-” prefix 1, the unemphasized form of “on-“, implying motion onward and therefore adding intensity – Old English “oncursie”.  It could be an occurrence of “a-” prefix 3, the unemphasized form of a completely different preposition spelled “on-” which formed verbs, adverbs, and prepositions with the meaning “onto”.  Or… in classical Latin, the “ad-” prefix before C or QU changed to “ac-” for mouth-ease reasons, as in accumulare.  The doubling of the C was applied to a number of words beginning with the sound regardless of the word’s origin.

We do have “bless” in a previous entry, so I’m pleased to see a form of “curse” here as well.  I wonder about the two different ways we saw “bless” used.  Does Thorin describe Mirkwood as “accursed” because he needs a good cuss-word with which to show his contempt of the place?  Or does he shudder and mop his brow and shift his eyes and feel the cold influence of the Necromancer?

  • 08.040 to this accursed forest?’ said Thorin.

“a-, prefix1.” OED Online. Oxford University Press, March 2015. Web. 18 May 2015.

“a-, prefix3.” OED Online. Oxford University Press, March 2015. Web. 18 May 2015.

“ac-, prefix.” OED Online. Oxford University Press, March 2015. Web. 18 May 2015.

“accurse, v.” OED Online. Oxford University Press, March 2015. Web. 18 May 2015.

“accursed, adj. and n.” OED Online. Oxford University Press, March 2015. Web. 18 May 2015.

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