Enchant

I’m trying to parse the difference between enchant (verb) and incantation (noun).  “Enchanting” is the adjective.  “Enchantment” seems to be the noun of just as much lineage as “incantation“, both from the Latin root incantare – through French “enchanter” in this case and “incantation” in the other.  Hmmm.

To exert magical influence upon; to bewitch, lay under a spell. Also, to endow with magical powers or properties.

  • 01.072 To seek the pale enchanted gold.
  • 07.023 he is under no enchantment but his own.
  • 07.107 in enchanted shape,
  • 07.126 for I have heard that it carries enchantment
  • 08.029 safe across the enchanted stream.
  • 08.035 They had crossed the enchanted stream;
  • 08.037 About four days from the enchanted stream
  • 08.059 was so enchanting that,
  • 08.130 and as the lights went out he fell like a stone enchanted.
  • 12.007 when the hobbit crept through the enchanted door
  • 12.015 and pierced with enchantment
  • 12.098 But the enchanted desire of the hoard
  • 13.020 drawn by its enchantment.

“enchant, v.” OED Online. Oxford University Press, June 2015. Web. 25 July 2015.

“enchantment, n.” OED Online. Oxford University Press, June 2015. Web. 25 July 2015.

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