Wrath

This has always struck me as a very biblical/epic word.  I’m giving it the “high” tag even though I have rather given up on the “high” tag.

  • 12.032 till the dawn chilled his wrath
  • 12.034 and stirring up Smaug’s wrath so soon.
  • 12.102 This was the outburst of his wrath
  • 14.013 the dragon’s wrath blazed to its height,
  • 14.035 and wrath on those unhappy creatures?
  • 17.010 and his voice was thick with wrath.
  • 17.050 so deadly was the wrath of the hands that held them.
  • 18.022 in his wrath.
  • 18.024 and his wrath was redoubled,

Whisk

To my surprise, “whisk” is not a sound word – it indicates the motion of a besom broom and comes from thence in Norse through Scots into English meaning that general motion.  “Whisker” is its operative form.

  • 01.059 they had whisked the trays
  • 02.042 I don’t suppose even a weasel would have stirred a whisker at it.
  • 08.003 he could catch glimpses of them whisking off the path

“whisk, n.1.” OED Online. Oxford University Press, June 2015. Web. 14 July 2015.

“whisk, v. (adv. and int.).” OED Online. Oxford University Press, June 2015. Web. 14 July 2015.

“whisker, n.1.” OED Online. Oxford University Press, June 2015. Web. 14 July 2015.