Glede

A live coal or ember.  Tolkien spelled it here as “glede”, a Middle English form of the word and also a dialectical word for a kite – a bird of prey.  Was he helping our imaginations to picture the coals and embers flying everywhere with deadly result?

  • 14.024 to sparks and gledes.

“glede | gled, n.” OED Online. Oxford University Press, March 2015. Web. 20 May 2015.

“gleed, n.” OED Online. Oxford University Press, March 2015. Web. 20 May 2015.

Lob

A “lob” – obsolete word – is a spider from Old English loppe.  But it’s also (separate word, spelled the same) a dialectical word for country bumpkin or a lout (a Scandinavian-rooted word).

Oh, yes.  This is why I did this.  One syllable.  Two obsolete words.  Classic bullying technique – what’s wrong with me calling you a spider?  It’s just a word for spider!  But we both know it means lout – and in Norse it means short and fat and clumsy and bumpkin.  Bilbo needed to pull out the big guns, word-wise, to distract the spiders from his friends, and he did it in three letters.  The master craftsman at play.

08.100 Lazy Lob and crazy Cob
08.119 Soon there came the sound of ‘Lazy Lob’

“† lob, n.1.” OED Online. Oxford University Press, March 2015. Web. 20 May 2015.

“lob, n.2.” OED Online. Oxford University Press, March 2015. Web. 20 May 2015.

Lust

This word’s obsolete meaning of desire descends from earlier meanings such as pleasure and delight, spotted in King Alfred’s translation of Boethius around the year 888.  The parallel and interlocked meaning of sexual desire is attested from about the year 1000, and seems to be locked with the descriptor “fleshly” in theological writings for a few centuries.

  • 12.015 but the splendour, the lust,
  • 15.049 and the lust of it was heavy on him.

“lust, n.” OED Online. Oxford University Press, March 2015. Web. 20 May 2015.

Mead (meadow)

While we contemplate this regional word for meadow, let’s enjoy some fermented honey and water.  Mead the drink is discussed here and the honey comes from flowers, which meadows certainly have!  It’s a low word… in a poem sung by elves.  Fascinating.

  • 09.053 Back to pasture, back to mead,

“mead, n.2.” OED Online. Oxford University Press, March 2015. Web. 20 May 2015.

Wrought

“Wrought” is the archaic past participle of the very common word “work”, but I simply couldn’t bear to throw it away.

  • 01.075 They shaped and wrought, and light they caught
  • 12.013 gold wrought
  • 12.013 and unwrought,
  • 12.096 for it was wrought of pure silver
  • 13.037 wrought for some young elf-prince long ago.
  • 18.033 and gold, wrought and unwrought
  • 18.033 and gold, wrought and unwrought

Lade

While the past participle “laden” is not archaic, the present form is!

  • 07.126 and he would lade them with food
  • 10.045 laden with rowers,
  • 11.003 each leading another pony heavily laden beside him;
  • 14.016 into laden boats
  • 19.004 O! Whither so laden,

“lade, v.” OED Online. Oxford University Press, March 2015. Web. 20 May 2015.

Kine

The old plural of “cow”.  Some Middle English and earlier plurals were formed with and “n” ending (housen = houses, eyen = eyes, oxen).  This word appears in an elven poem, so it gets a double boost in register!

  • 09.053 Where the kine and oxen feed!

“kine, n.1.” OED Online. Oxford University Press, March 2015. Web. 20 May 2015.

Forebode

“Bode” is archaic, but “forebode” is not.  I am fascinated.  Based on “bode” and since foreboding is certainly uncanny, I have given it a high tag.

  • 12.090 and his foreboding grew.
  • 14.007 You are always foreboding gloomy things!’

“bode, v.1.” OED Online. Oxford University Press, March 2015. Web. 20 May 2015.

“forebode, v.” OED Online. Oxford University Press, March 2015. Web. 20 May 2015.